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assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
. the warnings have been issued for at least 20 countries including the u.s. west coast. >>> good morning i am sherrie johnson. we have team coverage and live reports from around the u.s. and the world this morning. we kick things off with abc's emily schmidt live in washington with how white house officials are responding. >> reporter: the earthquake lasted second but the catastrophe continues to spread. there are tsunami warnings stretching across the a sick and waves are hitting hawaii right now. largest quake in japan's history shook a nation. and triggered tsunami waves that threatened the u.s. west coast. forcing evacuations in hawaii. >> it's time for a little aloha and a little you keep it simple and sensible and moving. >> reporter: cameras capture the moment the earthquake hit in japan. for lawmakers gathered for government, the newsroom shaken up by the 8.9 magnitude earthquake. the quake set off huge fires including this oil refinery north of tokyo. workers evacuated high rises and filled the streets. millions are without power after the deadly quake. one woman said i thought i was
of condolences today in washington calling for a safety review of all u.s. nuclear plants and offered assurances that harmful levels would not reach the west coast. >> now, state health officials are trying to reassure us tonight that the west coast does not face a serious threat from japan. this one is in san francisco. and uc berkeley scientists put up one on top of the engineering building. california's director of public health says reports are not true. >> there are winds shift sog some will be blowing west. almost all will get washed out by storms that are there and dissipate. >> dr. backer says there may be a slight increase in radiation over next few day buzz amount will be no greater than what we're exposed to on a daily basis. >> many people continue to have concerns about dangerous radiation reaching our shores. rain freedman has been following this story and not everyone believes what they hear from the government. >> that is true. it's more of mistrust. and there are a lot of people still buying radiation dedoctors on ebay, and are buying pills in stores. and there are people saying
dan balz, thank you for helping us remember him. you can join us again next sunday morning for another critical look at theedia. "state of the union with candy crowley" begins right now. candy will have an update on japan, the japanese ambassador to the united states will be among her guests. >>> the known death toll in japan's earthquake tsunami disaster is now over 1,200. the government official believes more than 10,000 people may have died in one region alone. and this morning, the possibility of meltdowns in two nuclear reactors. the japanese government believes there could be a second hydrogen explosion similar to one yesterday building another housing reactor. 200,000 people have been evacuated. at least nine tested positive and health authorities are already distributing iodine tablets as an antidote to radiation. public broadcasting in japan told evacuees to close doors and windows, put a wet towel over their nose and mouth and cover up. this morning the prime minister announced rolling power outages throughout the country and called this japan's most difficult mom
, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off the coast of japan overnight. there have been several powerful aftershocks being felt, up to 7.0 in magnitude. the quake was centered 300 miles from tokyo, but it was felt in tokyo. buildings swayed. take a look at these pictures. our bureau there in tokyo as well. some of our co-workers being thrown around at times as well. this is just one of the views inside. people poured out onto the streets afterwards. they say it's a city in chaos right now. the danger we have now, the concern, a tsunami. it did trigger a tsunami, massive waves, some as high as 30 feet, starting to come ashore in places. this wall of water is starting to bring with it -- it's washing away cars, boats, buildings. looks like lava almost making its way through. here's the most stunning picture. waves of mud and debris can be seen like lava flowing through some
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
evening to our viewers joining us in the west. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public especially those along the west coast, that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming across the pacific just aren't true. here now the latest on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, late today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, just under 10,000 missing and over three-quarters of a million people surviving without electricity in near freezing cold. thousands of people, including americans, continue to flee japan. we want to get the very it latest now and begin our reporting with nbc's robert bazell in tokyo. bob, good evening. >> rep
, and they are stating "save us." they are begging us and pleading for us to save them, and my answer is two words -- listen to me, i want those armed groups to listen to me real well, and i want the people in the east to hear this, as well. we are coming. >> white house spokesman jay carney said the administration has already taken and i quote, swift and dramatic actions, and it has when it comes to freezing libyan assets. as to doing what they need urgently, namely a no-fly zone, nato is reviewing options. >> firstly, there must be a -- a -- a demonstratable need. secondly, there must be a clear legal basis. and thirdly, a strong reason or support. >> we'll talk tonight about that no-fly zon with general wesley clark and fouad ajami. first tonight, bill neely, the first reporter into zawia after it fell to gadhafi's forces. >> reporter: we were the first journalists to reach the town's center, driving past dozens of burned out cars and tanks. a quarter of a million people live in zawia, or they did. this is a ghost town. shops closed. houses empty. streets filled only with debris. >> and that wa
tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen. >> -- sent over to support them in their efforts has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people, which were added to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've actually taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions, mounted them, one on a fixed wing aircraft, one on a helicopter. and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we have been collecting information as they've come back when t
nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has be
trucks, usually used to combat airplane fires, to shoot water from a safe distance. the entire operation is a race to get water into the severely damaged reactors before the fuel explodes. so far the radiation levels have been high enough to only be a serious threat to the workers at the site. still, the japanese government has ordered people living within 12 miles of the site to evacuate. those within 18 miles to stay indoors. the u.s. government says its residents within 50 miles should leave. >> we think it's a prudent measure to follow the evacuation based on how we would handle a situation like that in the united states. >> reporter: there are six reactors at the site. in unit 1 an explosion destroyed part of an outer building. in unit 2 there may have been an explosion rupturing the containment facility and possibly letting radioactive fuel escape. unit 3 was the target of today's water drops. it too had an explosion of the outer building and it also has exposed fuel rods. unit 4 was shut down for maintenance when the earthquake struck, but it became the subject of a controversy wh
of fighting government rebels after the u.n.-approved use of force in a no-fly zone in an effort to protect civilians on the ground from moammar qaddafi's forces. qaddafi warned hell would await anyone that attacked his country. >> we'll answer them. our response will make their lives hell as well as they are making our lives well. they will never enjoy peace because this is injustice. martha: i'm martha mccallum. rick: i'm rick folbaum. >> this resolution should send a strong message to colonel qaddafi and his regime that the violence must stop, the killing must stop and the people of libya mist be protected and have the opportunity to express themselves freely. qaddafi has lost his legitimacy. there is no justification for his leadership now that he perpetrated violence against his own people. rick: this is video of an air strike against a rebel camp near benghazi. martha: david, what specifically does this resolution authorize? report it imposes a no supply zone over libya. it says all libyan flights. but if you look at the language of this resolution it's much broader. it says all neces
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
: for a check of the weather, let us turn to meteorologist, brian van aken. >> brian: 8 chance of rain and it is going to be confined to the north bay. a little bit of a quiet rain-a chance. otherwise, partly /mostly cloudy. some breaks of sunshine temperatures and to the upper 50s and low 60s. not a particularly warm day. 58 and a san rafael. look for low 60s near the bay. 60s in the south bay, and the east bay. antioch, concord. 62 degrees. that rain, you can see that the forecast model is putting it into the north bay. this afternoon perhaps the wind shield wipers 32 times. significant rainfall later this week. the windshield wipers a couple of times today >> isabel: more of the tsunami coverage and how it impacted a small, north ccalifornia town. and it is still a bit overcast 60s. we will be back. ñ >> isabel: 7:10. this is video from pacifica. in anticipation of the tsunami that was traveling at the speed of an airplane. and beaches, peers were closed off. and low lying areas were voluntarily evacuated but no damage. in the pacific beach, the creek high was open. with waves only
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
the nation saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi's forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. >> but nearly two weeks in to the mission, gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. is doing enough to push him out. we'll talk with the president's ambassador to the u.n. and with republican senator john mccain. >>> walmart lawsuit. a massive sex discrimination suit against the retail giant heads to the supreme court today. it could involve more than a million female employees and cost america's biggest employer billions of dollars. >>> and the snake hunt. the venomous cobra remains on the loose creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. >> good to have you back. welcome back to the country, the time zone. >> nice to be back sitting next to you. but, boy, things were busy while i was away. and we begin this
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
as president obama works to assure americans there is no radiation risk in the u.s. fox 5 morning news continues right now. >>> we're going to get started at 6:00 thon friday as we look live over washington, d.c. this morning. it will be a nice one. temperatures already nice out there this mourn. it will be a great day. good morning, thank you for waking up with fox 5 morning news. i'm sarah simmons. >>> i'm steve chenevey, thank you for being with us this friday morning. let's say good morning to tony perkins. >> good morning everybody. not a bad day on tap for us. let's take a look, get to it, your satellite-radar composite, no moisture or precipitation out there i should say. humidity levels 75, 76%. we do have clouds across the region this morning. i do think we will feature some clouds during the course of the day. will we see sunshine? yes, there will be clouds around as well. nothing in the way of precipitation for us during the day. off to the west you could see a little shower or two later on. temperature, i will pull this out for you. you can see the big picture, more clouds
at that reactor are overheating. authorities are now working on a plan to use a water cannon to cool down a pool which is storing spent fuel rods at the number 4 reactor who was on fire earlier today. jenna: we are taking a look at the helicopters that were going to lower water on some of the nuke plants. there are still after shocks happening. have there been any more earthquakes today in japan. reporter: the last earthquake which shook tokyo happened about one and a half hours ago. that was just northeast of tokyo. and today there have been at least seven quakes with a magnitude of 5 and over. they actually seem to be heading in a southwest direction towards tokyo, and last night there was one which was literally underneath mount fugi which is tkoer tphapbt and overlooks tokyo, and that did spook some people, but there is no indication that it could lead anything to be some kind of eruption. jenna: david ross is taking in the destruction and terrible weather that hit the coastline in japan. maybe a personal question for you. how are you dealing with the situation and operating there in japan a
of the outer slopes are very, very -- a bit misleading. >> gerard fryer with us on the line. we appreciate you giving us time and perspective. we will continue to check in with you this morning. >> we're going to take a quick break and "american morning," special edition, covering the latest on this earthquake and tsunami. we'll be right back. wrench? wrench. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. time to face the pollen that used to make me sneeze. but with zyrtec® liquid gels, i get fast, 24-hour allergy relief. so i feel better by the time we tee off. zyrtec® liquid gels work fast, so i can love the air®. the one time of year red lobster creates so many irresistible ways to treat yourself to lobster. like our new lobster-and-shrimp trio with a parmesan lobster bake, our decadent lobster lover's dream with both sweet maine and buttery rock lobster tails and eleven more choices, each served with a salad and unlimited cheddar bay biscuits. come celebrate lobsterfest right
is the justification for continued u.s. taxpayer investment? in egypt and elsewhere, successive u.s. administrations failed to move beyond the status quo and prepare for the future. we should not associate the protests in jordan and bahrain events transpire in other places. we have failed to effectively use our resources to help build strong accountable institutions that protect basic human rights. this administration's crier decision to cut support from pro-democracy civil groups in egypt and the only fund groups seceded with the mubarak government is a mistake and it must never repeat. then the mistake of the bush administration and continued and that the country -- under the current administration, to get new business with the libyan regime. john's wife, victoria, my constituent, and others are in the audience today. madam secretary, i have a letter that they have written requesting yours and director miller's help in securing information about the role of gaddafi in the 1980's and 1990. some of us objected to the normalization of relations with the libyan regime. this is proof that the oppressor
'll get our first indication of the strength of the event on the u.s. mainland, over the next 15 minutes and that is when forecasts show the waves will reach san francisco. whether or not they'll be damaging, or even noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of sta
, evacuations were ordered for cities up and down the west coast. joining us by phone freelance reporter gavin blair. this is a massive quake. these images are frightening. tell us what happened. >> reporter: it was about 2:45 friday afternoon, the quake started, as many quakes that do hit japan started, didn't seem anything out of the ordinary. the situation became more violent. and the sways were going on longer and it became clear it was not a regular quake like the kind we experience a few times a month. >> sean: as we look at these images and the reports and stories and the tsunami that follows, you see this is it like we you in the middle of this feeling this? >> reporter: i was 300 terse, 200 miles away. i've been in japan -- 14 years and i've never experienced anything like this earthquakes are not unusual, but this was really different. people here are will drilled. it was different. people were diving under tables, getting into doorways and small rooms. it was terrifying. >> sean: even the aftershocks were powerful. >> reporter: they were going on through the night. i couldn't get ho
. a major earthquake strikes japan... killing hundreds.. and triigering tsunami pacific and u-s. we have just learned that tsunami waves are hitting hawaii... being evacuated.some counties in washington state and oregon are also being evacuated. evacuated.here's a look at what started it all... the 8-point-9 magnitude qqake sent people fleeing into streets... and fell into waters unnerneaah.up to three-hundred bodies have been found in japan.. and hundreds of others areestill missing.the entire west coast of the u-s is under a tsunami warning. will they or won't they?that's the question when it comes to the looming n-f-l lockout.. after a week extension..the deadline is today.the n-f-l players union and team owners are at crossroads when it comes to money.if no progress is made, look for the owners to lock out the players. we are now just one day away from our be-more healthy expo. all day tomorrow ... you can come out to the convention center downtown to take a step towards a new more active lifes. lifestyle. candace dold is live in our studio with a preview. ad lib. 33 coming up..
libya. what it could mean for u.s. military. computer hackers targeting celeb's private e-mail files and compromising pictures. now a federal investigation is under way. >>> let's start with moammar gadhafi changing course in response to the u.n. security council vote to impose a no-fly zone over libya and use all necessary measures to protect civilians. a no-fly zone could bring the u.s. military into libya with air strikes. some people are questioning, does this mean a third military engagement for an already-pressed u.s. military? gadhafi has imposed a cease-fire halting all military operations. this is a complete 180 for the leader who promised fierce attacks if libya was bombed. "the new york times" says four of its journalists who were reported missing in libya have been found. "the times" said all four were captured by forces loyal to gadhafi and will be released. we'll keep you posted on developments in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small part
. they continue yet again today. good morning. good to have you along with us. welcome, allison. >> the images out of japan are jaw dropping. this is a buddhist temple rocking back and forth from the sheer jolt of the quake. rescue and relief efforts are now underway. millions of people are left without food, water and electricity for days. japanese officials near thousands of people may be dead. bill: we have julian from sendai in northern japan where the tsunami came onshore near this nuclear power plants. what's the latest from there? >> i have been down by the sendai airport watching the japanese military collecting body parts from the paddy fields around the airport. the power is out in large parts of the city. there are huge fires along the waterfronts where the petroleum and refinery facilities have gone up. inland it's getting back to normal in that people are going back to where their houses used to be and they are trying to salvage what they can from the remains. homes are buckled, trees have been ripped up and shredded across the lands scape. it's a complete mess. . bill: it's mes he it
, america. joining us is "world news" anchor, diane sawyer, is who is there in sendai, japan, where the scope of the destruction is staggering. aftershocks still rocking the region. >> dealing with two crises. humanitarian. and an urgent disaster, to avoid a nuclear emergency. there was a third partial meltdown overnight. 11 injured in the blast. and after american officials detected radiation onboard "the uss ronald reagan," it was moved offshore. and nuclear experts still believe that the chances of a full-scale meltdown are remote. but the chances of a nuclear disaster, even worse than we feared. >> the death toll may top 10,000, with reports of thousands of bodies washing ashore. the disaster has also dealt a powerful blow to japan's economy. their stock market plunged overnight, as the government announced it would pump more than $200 billion into the economy. and we have new pictures for you to see. an aftershock this morning. when you see the images, you can see the power lines shaking in the snow. and the road splitting apart down below. again, this in this morning. we have
:07 their time. good morning america will be on that. we have warnings taking you to the west coast of the u.s. you can see the red shadeings, central california, all the way up through oregon. we continue to watch that wave work its way across the pacific. and locally, we are watching the wave of moisture out here and leftover sprinkles in harford and cecil county. after flooding rains that produced four inches shall we guaranteed a scattered showers and temperatures reached 52 before dropping this afternoon. 6:31. let's go to the road with kim brown. >> reporter: traffic is off to a pretty good start beginning your friday morning commute. we have a lot of flooding closures particularly on some of the secondary roadways near harford and cecil couldn't imlook live in howard county -- county, looking live at howard county traffic is moving well. southbound towards montgomery county no problems. here's what we have closures in aberdeen route 7 closed at james way because of high water. use pulaski highway as an alternate. havre de grace, creeks corner closed at staffordch this is in forest hill
will tell you that the systems used by agencies are fine. the systems that trigger uses are fine and the budget is where the decisions are made anyway. the important data set that is used for oversight and -- by the government and public is not good enough to be used. there are efforts under way to correct the problem. it is a good example about how there it is a lot of excitement around usaspending.gov, but the data has been unusable since the 1970's. the systems we use to track tax expenditures are worse. no one bothers to go back and check whether the estimates issued are correct after the numbers come in to the irs. the two systems used to track our never reconciled with one another. legislative information is still a rite of passage for technologists like myself. at this point, congress is making positive improvements but it is still difficult to work with. we never have access to the source data. we want the files that are the base line ingredients used to draft legislation. we can see them in the pdf's released but it cannot get the actual files. one more step back. i want
the pacific, including hawaii and the west coast. we have extended coverage, now, from japan and the u.s. >>> good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us on this very busy news day. a major disaster is unfolding in japan, after a megaearthquake hit overnight. >> now, the quake has triggered a tsunami in the northern part of the country. a 13-foot wall of water, washing away cars, busses, buildings, homes. incredible footage. >> tsunami warnings are posted for most of the pacific, including hawaii, where the coast guard is standing by. a powerful quake was centered around the area of sendai. but it rocked buildings in tokyo, hundreds of miles away. akiko fujita joins us from tokyo this morning. akiko, what is the latest? >> reporter: we are getting new numbers. we now know there are 18 people confirmed dead. that's from our partner out here, nhk. 18 people confirmed dead. and 60 people injured in tokyo alone. keep in mind that tokyo is hours away from the epicenter. 60 people injured in tokyo. we're not getting numbers out of northern japan where the epicenter was. but the numbers ex
at student cram.org -- student cam.org. >> joining us on newsmakers on this sunday is greg jaczko, thes chair of the nuclear regulatory commission appointed by president obama.ucle thanks for being with us. >> guest: thanks for having me. >> host: joining us with the questioning is matt wald, new york times, and steve power, both energy reporters. you for being with us. >> thank you. >> host: you're going to get a status report tomorrow on what happened in japan and lessons learned for the u.s., what do you think you're going to s learnsome. >> guest: we're going to have a meeting tomorrow with the full commission at the nrc to get an update on the current status onm the situation in japan. we'll probably have a brief discussion then about what kind of impact radiation can have for the public, and then we'll take a look at some things, kind ofei plan for a plan for how we intend to go forward to do our review and look at what, what kinds of thing we may need tod look at for the u.s. nuclear reactors. >> host: and with the fukushima plant in particular, we're told this morning that two of the
far. there is a tsunami warning in hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march 11, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this friday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm ann curry in for matt. this was a powerful earthquake. the images are stunning out of japan. it shows the tsunami sweeping inland, some 60 miles over farmland in sendai japan, 200 miles north of tok yochlt cars, housings, buildings being swept out with this massive wave. >> it started with an 8.9 magnitude quake that hit around 2:45 p.m. local time. it is the largest quake in japan's recorded history and the fifth strongest quake in the world in the past 111 years. there have been at least 19 aftershocks, including several stronger than last month's devastating quake in new zealand. a tsunami warning has been extended to include hawaii and parts along the u.s. west coast. >> when it starts to hit the continental shelf it moves as fast as 500 miles per hour, the speed of a jumbo jet. the first wave is exp
, the u.s. helped out a lot. the u.s. is the most influential in the short term, but there are other opportunities that we should be aware of. >> the second part of the ambassadors question -- are we doing enough to show our support? is it the visible enough? >> i would rather the japanese leaders be the ones -- i suspect we're not doing enough, but i think there is a media overloaded this point. we can take credit later. i hope the japanese leaders take it. >> is there something else we should be doing? >> they are looking for the gaps that could be killed. there is a possibility of outpouring from american organizations once it is clear what the needs are. some of that might be in the area of shelter down the road. but some of the most desperate needs come later, six months down the road when the tv cameras have moved on to the next emergency. sometimes that's sustained support can have more impact than the flashy initiatives. >> like permanent shelter. >> help with long-term reconstruction, it might be more effective. >> is there anything the united states could be doing that it i
>>> breaking news this thursday morning. >> getting out. overnight, the u.s. government announces plans to airlift americans from danger. >> it's because of the critical situation at the devastated nuclear plant. workers on a race against time before radiation spreads. but one expert tells abc news, it's almost too late. >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm mike marusarz, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. despite little radiation risk in most of japan, this morning, there's a race to leave the country. >> for the first time, the u.s. has authorized the evacuation of family members of american diplomats. charter planes are being used to fly americans away from danger. >> and the u.s. is pressuring japan to step up its efforts to avert a nuclear meltdown. they dropped sea water on the crippled reactors today. a heroic step, since the pilots are risking their lives to complete that mission. >> and the tokyo stock market, dropping once again. >>> it was a night of high-level phone calls over the nuclear crisis, as president obama spoke to the japanese prime minister. >> while
as soon as we get it. >>> top u.s. nuclear officials say it could take days even weeks to get japan's nuclear plant contained. officials have tried to use even water cannons. this is an animated model that shows what could happen to the plume of radiation from that damaged japanese reactor. federal officials say this does not pose a danger but here on the coast, scientists are keeping a watchful eye on that plume. as more people head out of japan into the united states, passengers are coming under new scrutiny as security agents begin screening for radiation. >>> meanwhile, president obama has been trying to reassure americans that we are safe. they don't expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast or any other part of the united states. >> further more the centers of disease control do not recommend the people of the united states take precautionary measures beyond staying informed. >> the president also promised to keep americans up to date on the crisis in japan. >>> the california department of public health today joined with all of the others who were saying that
to the northern quake zone and joins us now from near sendai, the city heavily damaged by the quake and tsunami. first off, describe the challenge of us of just trying to get to the disaster zone. >> reporter: well, the roads are completely blocked so one of the things that we've been looking for are the stories along the way as we try to make it up to the area that is hardest hit, that area hit by the tsunami, and we found one. this is a city called sirakawa and in this city there is a neighborhood where you can see some of the houses, it really does look like a small little community. you can see the three houses right here. what you can't see behind the three houses are eight houses. those eight houses, more than 24 hours ago, 25 hours ago when that earthquake struck, were completely buried by heavy land. there was a huge landslide, according to the people who live here. earth came sliding down and 25 hours later take a look over my right shoulder as we zoom in on what you're looking right there. heavy machinery digging. there are 13 people buried alive. there are children among the missing.
that if something like this happens in the u.s. that you'll have the ability, and i understand apparently from some of the testimony, what i've read is apparently you guys are in charge. in terms of implementing, you're the go-to people now? is that accurate in terms of dictating who does what and who's in charge? an ongoing plan that's developing? >> in response to nuclear power plant, the inside of the facility is regulated by nuclear regulatory commission. outside of the plant is actually the local and state responders with fema supporting them. if you have a scenario that resulted in release, the most important thing to occur is successfully evacuate people away from that plant. those the type of things that the exercise plans work on. these are the things that local and state officials train against, and our role of the federal government, to support them we additional resources required in the event of an evacuations had to take place. those are the thing, and i think from a standpoint of your question, if you would like senators to have our staff, reach out with the state and give your staff
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
beach, california. what do you see in terms of water? >> behind us, the water here in the harbor is low and we haven't seen it rise. the sheriffs department told us they are only expecting the tide to rise about a foot or two, but they are more concerned about the surge. the warnings came out early this morning before the sun even rose here in southern california. here's what a spokesman told us a short time ago. >> since 5:00 this morning, we closed down all the beaches and the piers and the marinas and the harshors. boating has been stopped. >> this is a tsunami advisory and not a threat. the advisory means that there is a possibility of a threat here. they have braced for that. they told residents not to go to the beaches and not to go to the docks or the harbors. they have not gone out and told people to stay away, but they are telling folks that come in the area to stay away. they are not expecting serious damage, but warning residents to be cautious. there is a higher threat in northern california. folks across the state are watching the beaches up and down california. >> talking
the core and fuel elements are actually exposed. he gives us a glimpse into what might have happened inside that nuclear plant at the time of the explosion. >> the temperatures start to build and then in a matter of several hours you can start to have the reactor experience a meltdown and other things could happen with these very high temperatures that could be as high as 5,000 degrees fahrenheit. for example, the zirconium that contains the fuel at those temperatures can spontaneously combust, catch fire. the water could generate hydrogen, and you might have fire and explosions. >>> another nuclear plant not far from the reactor that exploded alerted authorities that the cooling systems in three of the four reactors have failed. >>> now, at least 45 countries have now pledged rescue teams, supplies, and financial aid. japan has accepted offers of search and rescue teams. so far from australia, new zealand, south korea, and the united states. the u.s. has also sent navy ships to japan to help out with the relief. it's also helping with what president obama calls "lift capacity." heavy lifti
for being with us. >> a lot to cover this morning. in japan, the number of dead and the level of fear are rising fast. here are the latest developments in what is likely to be the costliest natural disaster the world has ever witnessed. more than 3,700 have been killed. close to 8,000 people are missing following friday's 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. >> japanese officials fear it may have been caused by a breach in the containment vessel of reactor number three. officials are now bringing in helicopters to drop water into a cooling pond through the damaged roof of the reactor hoping to slow or stop any meltdowns. >>> for several hours last night, things grew so tense at the power plant, work was suspended and everyone there was told to evacuate. now, they've now returned to the facility. let's go to senior international correspondent stan grant live in tokyo with us this morning. they told everyone to leave and now they're back working again furiously to get the situation under control. >> reporter: yeah, absolutely, christine. the story today has been radiation. these worker
're passing on knowledge that these young people will use and carry on for the rest of their lives. we need to reward you by letting you make more of a difference for kids. we need to build on what is being done here at kenmore. give our teachers more time to learn from each other, mentor h. other, more responsibilities in their schools. and to replace the they need -- the baby boomers, we need to recruit a whole new generation of teachers including the 100,000 a matter science teachers over the next decade. -- math and science teachers. these of the steps we're going to have to take to fix no child left behind. together with what we already doing to make college more affordable, and i am confident these reforms will help us to meet the goal i set when i took office. by the end of the decade, we will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world. we will be number one again. that is my priority. [applause] these steps will require reforms, a change in roles, standards, and attitudes. there is no avoiding the fact that it will also cost some money. fixing our faili
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